The Trip

Still of Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan in The TripStill of Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan in The TripMichael Winterbottom in The TripStill of Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan in The TripStill of Steve Coogan in The Trip

Plot

Steve Coogan has been asked by The Observer to tour the country's finest restaurants, but after his girlfriend backs out on him he must take his best friend and source of eternal aggravation, Rob Brydon.

Release Year: 2010

Rating: 7.0/10 (4,594 voted)

Director:
Michael Winterbottom

Stars: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Paul Popplewell

Storyline
When Steve Coogan is asked by The Observer to tour the country's finest restaurants, he envisions it as the perfect getaway with his beautiful girlfriend. But, when she backs out on him, he has no one to accompany him but his best friend and source of eternal aggravation, Rob Brydon.

Cast:

Steve Coogan

Steve


Rob Brydon

Rob


Paul Popplewell

Paul


Margo Stilley

Mischa


Claire Keelan

Emma


Rebecca Johnson

Sally


Dolya Gavanski

Magda


Kerry Shale

Steve's US Agent


Mercè Ribot

York Arms Receptionist

Taglines:
Eat, drink and try not to kill each other.



Details

Official Website:
Official site |
Official site [France] |

Release Date: 24 April 2011

Opening Weekend: $77,904
(USA)
(12 June 2011)
(6 Screens)

Gross: $2,014,922
(USA)
(25 September 2011)



Did You Know?

Trivia:

The two Michael Caine lines that Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon repeat again and again – "you were only supposed to blow the bloody doors off!" and "she was only 15" – are from
The Italian Job and
Get Carter respectively… and actually she was "only 16".

Quotes:

Steve/
Rob:
Come, come, Mr. Bond, you derive as much pleasure from killing as I do.



User Review

Watch the TV Series Instead

Rating: 9/10


The Trip, the television program, is a poignant, rambling, beautiful
little series, starring comedians Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon as
fictionalized versions of themselves.

The Trip, the film, which I was able to catch at a packed SIFF
screening, is an edited version of the television show. The six episode
series clocks in at about 180 minutes, and the film, at 107 minutes,
feels truncated and rushed comparatively. Both follow these hilarious
gents as they review restaurants in the English countryside, but with
those seventy-so minutes edited out, much of the nuance and poignancy
is lost—the tone shifts from somber (but funny), to seemingly desperate
for laughs. The film does often get those laughs (Coogan and Brydon, in
their largely improvised conversations, are very humorous), but it
fails to really make much impact beyond providing entertainment. The
more melancholy scenes retained from the television series often feel
tacked-on, and the transition between jokes and sentiment clunky, with
quiet moments and breathing time largely cut out.

Audiences looking for droll popcorn fare will not be disappointed, but
those wanting to be genuinely moved should skip the flick and instead
seek out the superlative television series, using whatever means they
can.