Aurora

Cristi Puiu in AuroraCristi Puiu in AuroraCristi Puiu in AuroraCristi Puiu in AuroraCristi Puiu in AuroraAurora

Plot

An apartment kitchen: a man and a woman discuss Little Red Riding Hood, their voices hushed, mindful of waking the little girl sleeping next room…

Release Year: 2010

Rating: 6.7/10 (498 voted)

Critic's Score: 63/100

Director:
Cristi Puiu

Stars: Cristi Puiu, Clara Voda, Catrinel Dumitrescu

Storyline
An apartment kitchen: a man and a woman discuss Little Red Riding Hood, their voices hushed, mindful of waking the little girl sleeping next room. Waste land on the city outskirts: behind a line of abandoned trailers, the man silently watches what seems to be a family. The same city, the same man: driving through traffic with two hand-made firing pins for a hunting rifle. The man is 42 years old, his name – Viorel. Troubled by obscure thoughts, he drives across the city to a destination known only to him.

Cast:

Cristi Puiu

Viorel


Clara Voda

Gina Filip


Catrinel Dumitrescu

Mrs. Livinski


Luminita Gheorghiu

Mioara Avram


Valentin Popescu

Doru


Gheorghe Ifrim


Alina Grigore

Vanzatoare


Letitia Rosculet

Doamna din Autoserviere

Release Date: 29 June 2011

Filming Locations: Bucharest, Romania



Technical Specs

Runtime:



User Review

Not for those who want an easy time

Rating: 7/10

If you are familiar with Puiu's previous film, Death of Mr. Lazarescu,
you will be well-prepared for the slow pace that draws attention to the
nonchalant, almost cold and disconnected sensibility of the ex-Eastern
Bloc. What you will find extremely different in Aurora is the lack of
words in many long scenes. Conversations are sparse, accentuated with
grunts or untranslatable sounds. The main character seems to walk
around like a ghost, one that everyone can see and can, if they were so
inclined, interact with, but also one that nobody seems too interested
in or concerned with. Of course, we know that there must be a reason
why we are following this seemingly aimless character, and we are
peeved at the very beginning by his paranoid over-the-shoulder glances
and slow scenes where he seems to be watching a family. About an hour
into the film, we know he is up to no good, though still nothing really
is explained. We do not really know who most of the people are in his
life, and why he is doing what he is doing. The violence also remains
unexplained. In the last half hour of the film his actions are finally
explained. This time the indifference and Soviet sensibility, the lack
of intelligent conversation, the attitudes of the resigned members of
the bureaucratic wheel all help to create a highly absurd and funny
"confession" scene. Without the last scene, the film would get a 5 from
me. It gets a 7 for capturing the sensibility of a whole people, a
whole way of reacting to life, so perfectly. It also manages to unravel
the complexity of adult lives without ever explaining anything. It
would have gotten an 8 or 9, if it was edited tighter, especially the
first 2 hours. It was great that things were not explained, but the
slow pace could have been helped a bit without losing from meaning.