Let's Go to Prison

November 17th, 2006







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more trailers Let's Go to Prison

Still of Chi McBride in Let's Go to PrisonStill of Will Arnett in Let's Go to PrisonStill of Will Arnett and Dax Shepard in Let's Go to PrisonStill of Will Arnett and Dax Shepard in Let's Go to PrisonStill of Will Arnett and Dax Shepard in Let's Go to PrisonStill of Will Arnett and Chi McBride in Let's Go to Prison

Plot
When a career criminal's plan for revenge is thwarted by unlikely circumstances, he puts his intended victim's son in his place by putting him in prison...and then joining him.

Release Year: 2006

Rating: 5.8/10 (11,583 voted)

Critic's Score: 27/100

Director: Bob Odenkirk

Stars: Dax Shepard, Will Arnett, Chi McBride

Storyline
John Lyshitski is a car stealing slacker, with a weed problem, and has been in Illinois' Rossmore State Penitentiary so many times, he knows its entire population of both staff and cons by their fast names. Cursed with the old ill luck of being in the wrong place, at the wrong time, in possession of the wrong car, he's been deemed a lost cause repeat offender in the eyes of everyone else. When the heartless judge, who has been behind most of his sentences, goes to the big court house in the sky, John decides to ruin the man's legacy by having the judge's only offspring, Nelson Biederman IV, thrown in the slammer along with him. Here, the world-class selfish jerk learns a certain old lesson the hard way: Do unto others as you would have others do unto you. But has John gone too far in the payback department?

Writers: Robert Ben Garant, Thomas Lennon

Cast:
Dax Shepard - John Lyshitski
Will Arnett - Nelson Biederman IV
Chi McBride - Barry
David Koechner - Shanahan
Dylan Baker - Warden
Michael Shannon - Lynard
Miguel Nino - Jesus
Jay Whittaker - Icepick
Amy Hill - Judge Eva Fwae Wun
David Darlow - Judge Biederman
Joseph Marcus - Pawn Broker
Nick Phalen - John - 8 years
A.J. Balance - John - 18 years
Jerry Minor - Breen Guard
Mary Seibel - Old Bartender

Taglines: Welcome to the slammer



Details

Official Website: Universal Pictures [United States] |

Release Date: 17 November 2006

Filming Locations: Chicago, Illinois, USA

Opening Weekend: $2,220,050 (USA) (19 November 2006) (1495 Screens)

Gross: $5,525,320 (USA) (24 November 2006)



Technical Specs

Runtime:  | (DVD version)



Did You Know?

Trivia:
Filmed at the now closed and historic Joliet Correctional Center in Joliet, Illinois - the same prison where the opening sequences of The Blues Brothers were shot.

Goofs:
Continuity: When Nelson Beterman IV is in the courthouse, you see John eating popcorn. In the first shot, you can't see the popcorn in the bag, but in the second shot, the bag is full to the brim. Again in the third shot, the popcorn is lower in the bag.

Quotes:
Barry: Would you like some Merlot? I make it in the toilet!
[Nelson shaking with fear]



User Review

More subtle than you'd think...

Rating: 9/10

There are movies that follow a relatively obvious plot. There are movies where you expect every plot twist ten minutes in advance. This certainly is one of those movies. But then, why would you go see a comedy looking for gripping plot lines? This is one of those movies that would have bombed, in the wrong hands. Given an average director and a mediocre cast, this movie would have been barely watchable. But under the care of Bob Odenkirk and a trio of skilled actors, it turns out as one of the funnier movies of the year.

Let me be clear about one thing: this movie is all about subtle, dry humor. The situations are, on their own, intentionally not funny. Played a different way, many of them would be downright terrifying. But the way the actors carry themselves through it, their timing, their facial expressions, bring out the absurdity of the serious script.

If you go into the movie expecting it to hit you in the face with everything it's got, you may be disappointed. But if you go prepared to pay attention and catch the nuances as well as the broad strokes, you'll barely stop laughing.









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