Father of the Bride Part II

December 8th, 1995







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more trailers Father of the Bride Part II

Still of Charles Shyer in Father of the Bride Part IIStill of Charles Shyer in Father of the Bride Part IIStill of Steve Martin and Charles Shyer in Father of the Bride Part IIStill of Steve Martin, Diane Keaton, Martin Short and Kimberly Williams-Paisley in Father of the Bride Part IIStill of Steve Martin and Martin Short in Father of the Bride Part IIStill of Steve Martin and Diane Keaton in Father of the Bride Part II

Plot
In this sequel to "Father of the Bride", George Banks must accept the reality of what his daughter's ascension from daughter to wife...

Release Year: 1995

Rating: 5.6/10 (14,134 voted)

Critic's Score: 49/100

Director: Charles Shyer

Stars: Steve Martin, Diane Keaton, Martin Short

Storyline
In this sequel to "Father of the Bride", George Banks must accept the reality of what his daughter's ascension from daughter to wife, and now, to mother means when placed into perspective against his own stage of life. As the comfortable family unit starts to unravel in his mind, a rapid progression into mid-life crisis is in his future. His journey to regain his youth acts as a catalyst for a kind of "rebirth" of his attitude on life when he and his wife, Nina, find how their lives are about to change as well.

Writers: Albert Hackett, Frances Goodrich

Cast:
Steve Martin - George Banks
Diane Keaton - Nina Banks
Martin Short - Franck Eggelhoffer
Kimberly Williams-Paisley - Annie Banks-MacKenzie (as Kimberly Williams)
George Newbern - Bryan MacKenzie
Kieran Culkin - Matty Banks
BD Wong - Howard Weinstein
Peter Michael Goetz - John MacKenzie
Kate McGregor-Stewart - Joanna MacKenzie (as Kate McGregor Stewart)
Jane Adams - Dr. Megan Eisenberg
Eugene Levy - Mr. Habib
Rebecca Chambers - Young Woman at Gym
April Ortiz - Olivia
Dulcy Rogers - Ava (the Beautician)
Kathy Anthony - Beautician #2

Taglines: Expect the unexpected

Release Date: 8 December 1995

Filming Locations: 843 S. El Molino Avenue, Pasadena, California, USA

Box Office Details

Budget: $30,000,000(estimated)

Gross: $76,594,000 (USA)



Technical Specs

Runtime:



Did You Know?

Trivia:
Although this sequel to Father of the Bride is not a remake of Father's Little Dividend, (the sequel to the original Father of the Bride (1950)_), the opening scenes of the two films, including the narration spoken to camera by the father character, are virtually identical.

Goofs:
Continuity: At the end when Matty is handed his new nephew, his hand position changes from the time he gets it and everybody yells "two hands!" to when the camera angle changes an he turns away.

Quotes:
George Banks: [talking about his baby's name] Franck Banks - has sort of a continental ring to it.



User Review

A nice, feel-good movie, though you have to suspend credulity

Rating:

I enjoyed this film, as I did Father of the Bride (1991), though I had to suspend my credulity a lot. This film was less realistic than the film it was based on, Father's Little Dividend (1951), with Spencer Tracy and Elizabeth Taylor. For example, it's unlikely that George Banks, a highly successful business owner who obviously must think through his decisions, would be so impetuous as to sell the house he loves and end up having to buy it back at a significant mark-up. (George and Nina decide to sell following a rainstorm that caused their kitchen ceiling to leak, even though the house had two storeys above it.) The new baby *wing* which the Banks then decide to build on to their repurchased home is equally ridiculous, since the house is already huge and only young son Matty is still at home. Between the ill-conceived house sale and repurchase, the posh baby wing and the lavish baby shower, featuring storks flown in from Austria, I don't think George Banks could possibly have spent more money. In the previous film, Father of the Bride (1991), Bryan's parents were portrayed as wealthy, but George is clearly a millionaire himself. I did enjoy this movie -- it's funny, romantic and very warm, with beautiful sets -- but I would have preferred a little less over-the-top consumerism.









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