Oslo, August 31st

August 31st, 2011







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more trailers Oslo, August 31st

Oslo, August 31stOslo, August 31stOslo, August 31st

Plot
One day in the life of Anders, a young recovering drug addict, who takes a brief leave from his treatment center to interview for a job and catch up with old friends in Oslo.

Release Year: 2011

Rating: 7.7/10 (798 voted)

Director: Joachim Trier

Stars: Anders Danielsen Lie, Hans Olav Brenner, Ingrid Olava

Storyline
One day in the life of Anders, a young recovering drug addict, who takes a brief leave from his treatment center to interview for a job and catch up with old friends in Oslo.

Writers: Pierre Drieu La Rochelle, Joachim Trier

Cast:
Anders Danielsen Lie - Anders
Hans Olav Brenner - Thomas
Ingrid Olava - Rebecca
Anders Borchgrevink - Øystein
Andreas Braaten - Karsten
Malin Crépin - Malin
Petter Width Kristiansen - Petter
Emil Lund - Calle
Tone Beate Mostraum - Tove
Renate Reinsve - Renate
Øystein Røger - David
Kjærsti Odden Skjeldal - Mirjam
Iselin Steiro -
Aksel Thanke - Therapist
Petter With -

Release Date: 31 August 2011

Filming Locations: Oslo, Norway

Technical Specs

Runtime:



Did You Know?

Trivia:
The movie is very loosely based on the French book "Leu feu follet", a 1931 novel by Pierre Drieu La Rochelle.

Quotes:
Thomas: Proust is Proust.



User Review

Beautiful, true and devastating

Rating: 10/10

The most hard-hitting and resonant film I've seen in a long time, Oslo August 31st sets itself up with serene, fuzzy home footage and tales of blissful memories spent in the titular city of Oslo only to cut to the bleak life of Anders, a former heroin addict on his first day of life out of rehab. Searching for a meaning and a purpose in this new life he finds little in his friends' bourgeois city routines, which he neither desires nor feels he could achieve anyway, and their claims that "it'll all get better" fail to move a mind constantly probing and analysing the reality of his situation.

He soon undergoes an intense conversation in a park overlooking the city with his closest friend, wherein Anders pours out his thoughts of the time the two have spent apart, and the precision of their rapport matched with the lead's acting make the whole scene feel horribly real.

Anders wanders the often-empty city like a ghost, sitting in a café surrounded by the hollow dreams of others ("Plant a tree. Swim with dolphins. Write a great novel") and dwelling on the weight of his own existence. In two minds whether to leave the city, increasingly desperate and always beautifully shot, we follow him through the night until sunrise, when Anders appears to us in a sequence at his most unpredictable.

Undeniably disturbing, yet intimate and tender, this is a film that already feels close to my heart, one unafraid to bring up difficult questions and brilliantly able to provoke an idea of the absurdity of it all.









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